Author Archives: Jacob Edmond

About Jacob Edmond

Jacob Edmond is an Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Otago, New Zealand. He is author of A Common Strangeness: Contemporary Poetry, Cross-Cultural Encounter, Comparative Literature (Fordham UP, 2012). His articles have appeared in journals such as Comparative Literature, Contemporary Literature, Poetics Today, The China Quarterly, the Slavic and East European Journal, and Russian Literature. He is editor (with Henry Johnson and Jacqueline Leckie) of Recentring Asia: Histories, Encounters, Identities (Brill / Global Oriental, 2011), and editor and translator (with Hilary Chung) of Yang Lian’s Unreal City: A Chinese Poet in Auckland (Auckland University Press, 2006). For more, see: http://www.otago.ac.nz/english/staff/edmond.htm http://otago.academia.edu/JacobEdmond http://commonstrangeness.wordpress.com/

Three Percent 2014 Best Translated Book Awards: Poetry Finalists

Three Percent has just announced the poetry finalists for 2014 Best Translated Book Awards. Check out the great lineup here.

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Archive of the Now

I first attended the annual meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association a decade ago. It was a small affair gathering together a few hundred people on the somewhat desolate outskirts of Ann Arbor. In stark contrast, the ACLA’s latest … Continue reading

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Giusi Tamburello on A Common Strangeness

I am very grateful to Giusi Tamburello for giving A Common Strangeness its first review in Italian, in the journal InVerbis. Tamburello describes A Common Strangeness as “un volume molto ricco e stimolante.” You can read her full review here.

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Andrea Bachner reviews A Common Strangeness

I was delighted to discover recently that Andrea Bachner has reviewed A Common Strangeness for CLEAR (Chinese Literature: Essays, Articles, Reviews).  Bachner concludes the review very kindly: “If Edmond’s A Common Strangeness with its linguistic expertise, its cross-cultural scope, its … Continue reading

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New issue of Deep South online

A new issue of the University of Otago’s electronic literary journal Deep South is out now. Lynley Edmeades and Catherine Dale have done a wonderful job with the latest number. The site has at the same time been given a … Continue reading

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Chinese Literature Today reviews A Common Strangeness

“By putting texts of disparate cultural and even historical moments into physical proximity with one another, by reproducing and reading these artworks together in a powerful act of multilingual erudition, and by bring them into a generatively loose organization through … Continue reading

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Helen Tartar

I was devastated to learn this morning of the death of Helen Tartar in a car accident. Over the coming days and weeks, there will no doubt be many tributes from eminent scholars and editors who knew Helen much better … Continue reading

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Michael Peverett on A Common Strangeness

Michael Peverett has a brief but thoughtful post about A Common Strangeness on Intercapillary Space.

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Otago poetry and poetics podcasts

Some of the recordings from last year’s Poetry with a Pulse series of readings, held in Dunedin, New Zealand, are now online and available for download below and on the University of Otago’s Humanities podcasts page. These include recordings of … Continue reading

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Miscelánea reviews A Common Strangeness

“A Common Strangeness is a highly recommended book for all scholars interested in comparative approaches to literature.”—María Colom Jiménez in Miscelánea (read the full review here)

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