Mikhail Iossel on Arkadii Dragomoshchenko in The New Yorker

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Dmitrii Shubin, Aleksandr Skidan, and Arkadii Dragomoshchenko, 1992 (from the Borei Gallery archive)

Misha Iossel’s remembering of Arkadii Dragomoshchenko in a single sentence begins “Remember when … remember … remember how, thirty years ago, yes—after the requisite sum of money had been collected, in half-handfuls of small change and occasional crumpled rubles, for however many bottles could be afforded of whatever toxic, domestic ersatz port or esophagus-singeing Bulgarian dry red might be available that night at the basement liquor store diagonally across the darkly illuminated prospekt, five tall floors below; and then, after the eager young person dispatched to fetch the booze had returned to the loft, however many long minutes later, laden with bottles, winded but happy and greeted with discordant cheers…” The rest of Iossel’s “Sentence” is here.

About Jacob Edmond

Jacob Edmond is an Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Otago, New Zealand. He is author of A Common Strangeness: Contemporary Poetry, Cross-Cultural Encounter, Comparative Literature (Fordham UP, 2012). His articles have appeared in journals such as Comparative Literature, Contemporary Literature, Poetics Today, The China Quarterly, the Slavic and East European Journal, and Russian Literature. He is editor (with Henry Johnson and Jacqueline Leckie) of Recentring Asia: Histories, Encounters, Identities (Brill / Global Oriental, 2011), and editor and translator (with Hilary Chung) of Yang Lian’s Unreal City: A Chinese Poet in Auckland (Auckland University Press, 2006). For more, see: http://www.otago.ac.nz/english/staff/edmond.htm http://otago.academia.edu/JacobEdmond https://commonstrangeness.wordpress.com/
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