Tag Archives: Дмитрий Пригов

Svetlana Boym

I was deeply shocked and saddened to learn last year of the death of Svetlana Boym. A few weeks ago, at the American Comparative Literature Association annual meeting at Harvard University, I joined colleagues, friends, and family for a session … Continue reading

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Prigov’s concrete poems get bigger

One of Dmitri Prigov’s Stikhogrammy (poemographs or versographs) about which I write in A Common Strangeness has been blown up to the size of a multistory apartment building as part of an art project in Belyaevo, an area in Moscow … Continue reading

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Ripples in language

Stone and Circles on Water (Камень и круги на воде) is the eighteenth in Dmitri Prigov’s series of poems built around the Russian alphabet, or azbuka, and the work that for me most clearly encapsulates Prigov’s “iterative poetics,” about which … Continue reading

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Dmitri Prigov’s iterative poetics

My article on Dmitri Prigov’s “iterative poetics” (free download to 17 Jan. 2015) is just out in a special issue of Russian Literature, which also includes illuminating articles by Mary Nicholas, Ksenya Gurshtein, and Dennis Ioffe, who edited the issue. … Continue reading

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Prigov’s visual poems in English

I’m very excited that someone is finally having a go at translating Dmitri Prigov’s Stikhogrammy into English. Kristin Reed is a braver soul than me, and it’s wonderful to see her translations of what she terms Prigov’s Versographies published in the … Continue reading

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Prigov’s Little Coffins

I have just added a post to my Iterations commentary on Jacket2. The post continues my discussion of the book as an iterative form and draws on my discussion of Dmitri Prigov’s Grobiki otrinutykh stikhov or Little Coffins of Rejected … Continue reading

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Stephanie Sandler translates Elena Fanailova

Stephanie Sandler’s translation of Russian poet Elena Fanailova’s poem “Lena i Lena” (“Lena and Lena”) has just gone up as a feature on Jacket2. Sandler introduces her translation by mapping out beautifully how Fanailova’s work undoes the false binary of … Continue reading

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